Mass Wine, Sacramental Wine, Communion Wine, Altar Wine

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Mass Wine, Sacramental Wine, Communion Wine, Altar Wine

The majority of mainstream liturgical churches require that sacramental wine should be pure grape wine. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, for example, sacramental wine used in the Divine Liturgy must usually be pure red grape wine, often sweet, though this is not required. Greek churches favour the use of Mavrodaphne or Nama, while Russian churches favour Kagor. Wines with additives, such as retsina, are not allowed.

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In Eastern Christianity sacramental wine is usually red, to better symbolize its change from wine into the blood of Jesus Christ, as is believed to happen at the Eucharist. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, wine used for the Divine Liturgy must be fermented, red grape wine.

In Western Christianity, white wine is also used for the practical purpose of avoiding stains on the altar cloths.[2]

In most liturgical rites, such as the Roman, Byzantine, Antiochene, and Alexandrian, a small quantity of water is added to the wine when the chalice is prepared, while in the Armenian Rite the wine is consecrated without the previous mingling of water. In the Byzantine Rite some warm water, referred to as the zeon (Greek: “boiling”), is added to the consecrated wine shortly before the Communion.

Mass Wine, Sacramental Wine, Communion Wine, Altar Wine